Emily Myers

Fine studio ceramics


Techniques

Emily Myers throws vessels on the wheel in both red stoneware and porcelain clay. These two very different clays, result in a broad range of work, but all with the starting point of the thrown pot.

Throwing a pot
Throwing a pot

Strong simple forms are thrown on the wheel and left to dry overnight. The state of the clay is then known as “leather-hard” and can be worked in various ways. Some dome-like forms are cut off their bases and flattered to form the flat rocking pots. Some pots are faceted with a cheese wire. This is a traditional technique, that Emily has taken one step further, by introducing a twist into the facets. Other forms are painstakingly carved with a looped wire modelling tool to form parallel grooves. The accuracy of the carving is achieved purely by eye, a steady hand, and a great attention to detail.

Glaze test pieces
Glaze test pieces

Glazes

A variety of slips, oxides and glazes are used to achieve a range of effects in the oxidised firing. She makes up all her own glazes from the raw materials, following various recipes, including some from Colin Pearson. Testing new glaze recipes and oxide additions, is exacting and time consuming, but one is sometimes rewarded with beautiful results. Emily is noted for using Barium Glazes which give rise to saturated colour effects, which often evoke strong associations.